Nutrition Mistakes

Who used to believe margarine was healthier than butter?

Sadly, almost everybody fell for that one.

We all make nutrition mistakes from time to time, especially when we have a goal such as quick weight loss.

These resources look at some of the common dietary mistakes people make.

Nutrition Mistakes

5 Typical Nutrition Mistakes 

Here’s a quick run through some common mistakes that you should try to avoid;

Obsessing over calories

Sometimes people obsess over calories too much rather than considering the nutrient-density of the food they’re eating.

For example, an Oreo cookie contains fewer calories than half an avocado, but that doesn’t make it the healthier choice.

Drinking calories rather than eating them

Most liquid calories are from isolated sugars (soda, sweet coffee drinks) and contain minimal nutrition.

Eating nutritious whole foods is much better for both satiety and your health.

Fearing fat

There is no convincing science that suggests fat consumption is “bad”.

Particularly, whole foods which are high in fat such as beef, eggs, fish, avocados and olives offer plenty of nutrients in addition to the fat content.

Believing that “eating less and moving more” is the key

Technically, eating less and moving more would be beneficial to almost everyone on earth.

However, if it were that simple, then everyone would be in good health. For instance, telling an overweight person that all they have to do is “eat less” is unhelpful.

In truth, it is much better to concentrate on developing an overall healthy and sustainable lifestyle.

Exercise, sleep well and eat satiety-promoting foods that you enjoy. The amounts of these foods can then be adjusted if necessary going forward.

Believing everything you read online/in the media

Although many people do great work, so-called nutrition experts aren’t always as trustful as they may seem. and they may have ulterior motives (such as promoting a vegan agenda or selling a book).

So whether it’s something on this website or in your grandma’s paper, if you like something you read then do a bit of research into it first. In other words, it’s good to seek useful information, but try to fact-check it first.

For example, some may have ulterior motives (such as promoting a vegan agenda or selling a book about an unscientific claim). So, whether it’s something in your grandma’s paper or even something on this website; if you like something you read, then do a bit of research into it first.

In other words, it’s good to seek useful information, but try to fact-check it first. What do other people think about the claims made? Is there any evidence or is it only opinion?

Some things to look for include what other people think about the claims made, and is there any evidence or is it only opinion?

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